Special Attractions
 
 
 



Notre-Dame Basilica

Notre-Dame Basilica
100 Notre-Dame Street West
(514) 842-2925

This magnificent church in the Gothic Revival style, completed in 1829, attracts hundreds of thousands of worshippers and visitors every year. Its interior offers a feast of visual and aural splendours: sculpted wood statuary with painted and gold leaf accents, paintings, sculptures, the Casavant organ, spectacular stained glass, and more. At the rear is the smaller Sacré-Cœur chapel. Evenings, a sound and light show brings to life the Basilica's history and architectural heritage; concerts are often held inside.

For more about the Basilica, opening hours and rates:
www.basilicanddm.org

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Bonsecours Ceramic Centre

 

Bonsecours Ceramic Centre
444 Saint-Gabriel Street
(514) 866-6581

The Centre is a space for training, development and dissemination of the ceramic arts. A showroom presents pieces by renowned artists as well as younger graduates, helping provide exposure for Québec creators. The Bonsecours Ceramic Centre is located in the former No. 2 Fire Station, built in 1872. Admission is free.

For more about the Centre:
www.centreceramiquebonsecours.net

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Montréal World Trade Centre

 

Montréal World Trade Centre
747 Victoria Square
(514) 982-9888

This complex of office buildings, completed in 1992, incorporates the façades and other elements of several heritage structures, including the remarkable Nordheimer Building (1888). Inside, the offices look onto a vast atrium and shopping promenade built along the former Ruelle des Fortifications. Other attractions include a fragment of the Berlin Wall and a black granite reflecting pool with a fountain statue–a work by French architect and sculptor Dieudonné-Barthélemy Guibal (1699–1757) that originally topped a fountain in Saint-Mihiel, in the Meuse department of France. Admission is free.

View the detailed record for this building and the block in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Canadian Music Centre (CMC)

 

Canadian Music Centre (CMC)
416 McGill Street
(514) 866-3477

The CMC is home to the country's largest collection of contemporary Canadian musical works. The Centre's music library houses a collection of nearly 16,000 scores as well as recordings and reference information, such as biographical records on some 650 Canadian composers. On sale are about 700 CDs featuring the music of the CMC's Associate Composers, as well as releases on Canadian independent record labels. Admission is free. Consultation and research by appointment.

For more about the Centre:
www.musiccentre.ca

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel

 

Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel
400 Saint-Paul Street East
(514) 282-8670

A place of worship for almost 350 years, the Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel is one of Montréal's most significant and symbolic religious and heritage sites, attracting visitors who come to admire its religious, architectural and artistic treasures. Concerts are held regularly throughout the year. A visit to the Marguerite-Bourgeoys Museum includes access to the chapel tower, affording panoramic views of Old Montréal and the Old Port. Chapel: Admission is free (except during some concerts); Museum: paid admission.

For more about the Chapel and opening hours:
www.marguerite-bourgeoys.com

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Court of Appeal of Québec

 

Court of Appeal of Québec
100 Notre-Dame Street East

Inaugurated in 1926 to house the provincial criminal courts as well as various government services, this building lost its original function in 1971 when the courts moved to the new Palais de justice built across the street, at 1 Notre-Dame Street East. The building was later the home of Québec's music and drama conservatories. Major renovations conducted between 2001 and 2005 have restored its full presence and lustre. The building now houses the Court of Appeal of Québec and bears the name of the main architect, Ernest Cormier. The lobby, open to the public, is an exercise in uncluttered volumes and materials well suited to the building's formal function: a court of justice. Also notable are the Art Deco torchère lamps designed by master metalsmith Edgar Brandt, and a superbly ornamented coffered ceiling. Open Monday to Friday.

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 


DHC / ART

DHC / ART
451 Saint-Jean Street
(514) 866-6767

DHC / ART is a new exhibition space dedicated to presenting some of the leading contemporary art of our time from around the world. Free admission.

For more about DHC / ART and opening hours:
www.dhc-art.org

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 
 


Bank of Montréal

Royal Bank

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

Lobbies of the Big Banks

The impressive Bank of Montreal lobby (119 Saint-Jacques Street) is in the oldest (1845–47) of the Bank's three buildings on the north side of Place d'Armes. This imposing, stylish structure, the work of architect John Wells, was an early herald of a great classicist tradition in Canadian bank building architecture. The vast lobby dates from the early 20th century, when the Bank rebuilt its head office almost entirely–though the original building's façade and portico were retained. It entrusted the work to the prestigious U.S. firm of McKim, Mead and White.

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 

The lobby of the Royal Bank building at 360 Saint-Jacques Street is well worth a visit for its sumptuous vaulted ceilings and charming old-time wickets. Built between 1926 and 1928 to house the Bank's head office, the 22-storey building was the tallest in the British Empire at the time, and kept that record for quite some time. It was a symbol of metropolitan Montréal of the first half of the 20th century and remains a testament to those boom years.

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 

An imposing row of Corinthian columns is a distinctive feature of the former head office of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce at 265 Saint-Jacques Street, built between 1907 and 1909. In the lobby, visitors can admire Winged Victories as figureheads of a sculpture symbolizing commerce.

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

City Hall

 

City Hall
275 Notre-Dame Street East

The history of Montréal's city hall is more turbulent than its stately exterior suggests. Built between 1872 and 1878, it survived a serious fire in 1922. And it was from this balcony that General Charles de Gaulle, the visiting French President, famously uttered "Vive le Québec libre!" in 1967. As night falls, city hall is gradually bathed in magnificent architectural lighting created as part of the Old Montréal Lighting plan. Admission to the lobby is free during the week; free guided tours available in summer, Monday to Friday. Reservations mandatory for groups; call (514) 872-0077.

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

La Guilde Graphique

 

La Guilde Graphique
9 Saint-Paul Street West
(514) 844-3438

Located in a magnificent 18th-century building, this workshop-gallery, unique in North America, is a space for creation, exhibition and sales of original works on paper and engravings by local and international artists. Also includes a display of centuries-old printing presses. Admission is free.

For more about the Guilde:
www.guildegraphique.com

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 

Bonsecours Market

 

Bonsecours Market
350 Saint-Paul Street East
(514) 872-7730

Easily recognized by its splendid silvered dome, which has come to symbolize Old Montréal, Bonsecours Market, opened in 1847, has over the years been the site of a public market, a concert hall and even Montréal's city hall (from 1852 to 1878, to be exact). Today it houses cafés-terrasses, restaurants and chic craft boutiques featuring the work of Québec, Canadian and Aboriginal designers: craft items, designer objects, fashion, jewelry and period furniture. The Market also occasionally hosts exhibitions and other events open to the public. Open seven days a week.

For more about the Market and opening hours:
www.marchebonsecours.qc.ca

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)

 
 
 

 


Centaur Theatre

 

Centaur Theatre
453 Saint-François-Xavier Street
(514) 288-3161 or (514) 288-1229

Centaur Theatre is a jewel in Montréal's cultural crown. Founded in 1969, Centaur is Québec's premier English-language theatre and one of the most exciting theatre companies in the country. Its edifice — home of the first Montréal Stock Exchange — houses two performance spaces and the Seagram's art gallery and lounge. Winner of multiple awards, Centaur is dedicated to delivering world-class theatre for our times. From the classics to contemporary, Centaur produces theatre that reflects the pulsating, ever-changing world around us and gives voice to all that is Montréal.

For more about the Centaur Theatre:
www.centaurtheatre.com

View the detailed record for this building in the Heritage Inventories (French only)