8th World Conference of Historical Cities
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NUMBER 7SEPTEMBER 2003

SHEILA COPPS, MINISTER OF CANADIAN HERITAGE, WELCOMES ALL THOSE TAKING PART IN THE 8TH WORLD CONFERENCE OF HISTORICAL CITIES.

NEWS ON THE ROUND TABLES:
ROUND TABLE III – ARE DEVELOPMENT COSTS AN EXPENSE OR AN INVESTMENT?

THE BONSECOURS MARKET, WHERE THE CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD, IS A HISTORIC MONUMENT AT THE HEART OF MONTREALERS’ CIVIC AND CULTURAL LIFE. IT IS ONE OF THE TEN MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE.

The Bonsecours Market and City Hall in background
 The Bonsecours Market and City Hall in background.  Photo : Le photographe masqué
 
Minister Sheila Copps








"Greetings to all those taking part in the 8th World Conference of Historical Cities."



Sheila Copps

Canada

Full text

Sheila Copps
Minister of
Canadian Heritage,
Sheila Copps

 
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News on the round tables:
Round table III – Are development costs an expense or an investment?

Mr. Jean-Yves Provencher
Jean-Yves Provencher, Deputy Mayor of Saguenay, will be addressing the question, along with the Mayors of Lyon and Florence.
The text of the presentation by Mr. Simone Siliani, of Florence, is now available.
Mr. Simone Siliani
Mr. Bruce McNiven
The guest expert is Bruce McNiven, President of Héritage Montréal and Partner in the Heenan Blaikie legal firm.
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BONSECOURS MARKET
350 SAINT-PAUL STREET EAST

  The Bonsecours Market and City Hall in background   Location  
     
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The Bonsecours Market is acknowledged as one of Canada’s finest heritage buildings. It is built of cut stone, with a three-storey pavilion at each end and a domed lantern tower in the middle.

This Classical Revival building, dating back to the 1840s, is a fine example of how a historic building can be restored and redeveloped for modern use. It is located in the heart of the city’s historic district, hosts cultural and commercial activities, and attracts some 11 million visitors a year.

While it is now used for a variety of purposes and has undergone many changes over the years, the Bonsecours Market building was Montréal’s main public market for over a century. It mirrored the country’s social and economic development, and quickly became the leading showcase for Canadian manufactured goods.

Today it continues in this role, as it is home to the headquarters of Quebec’s arts and crafts council and the Institute of Design Montréal, along with some 15 boutiques carrying Quebec creations. Fine local fare also has pride of place at the restaurants and cafés in the Market.

The 8th World Conference of Historical Cities will be held upstairs, mainly in the ballroom.

www.marchebonsecours.qc.ca

Elevation of Bonsecours Market
 
Plan of Level 3
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September 4, 2003